For Christmas I got a coffee grinder as a present.  Having looked at numerous models both electric and manual we opted for a manual grinder.  This was principally as reviews tended to be a bit up and down even on popular electric grinders, and getting them in the UK is quite difficult.  I opted for this:

Shown next to our crappy kettle for comparison of size.  Actually it’s probably slimmer than it looks.  It’s from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B001804CLY

Like all the best stuff, it comes from China and ALL of the instructions are in Chinese.  Configuring it isn’t rocket science though.

Part of the reason I went for this was it was the canonical burr grinding element bit, which is supposedly the best type.  I can vouch for the quality of the grind as I set to “notch 3″ on the first grind, and it came out like powder (suitable for Turkish/Greek coffee I’d imagine).  I now use it on “notch 10″ and there’s probably 20-25 notches in total, configured by a three wing nut on the bottom of the black bit.

This is what the innards look like:

And this is what a canonical burr looks like:

 

I don’t clean it every day as it seems to keep reasonably clean of its own accord.  That’s with about a week’s worth of debris on it.

Part of having good quality coffee isn’t just grinding it, however, it’s keeping the coffee fresh in the first place.  For that I bought some airlock bags from Lakeland, which come with a plunger to suck the air out.  I apportion my coffee into a single cup’s worth and put it in separate bags.  For my large cup it’s 8 grams of coffee beans, so I had to buy some relatively accurate scales too (also from Lakeland).

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/14931/Lakeland-Airlock-Starter-Kit